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Re: More STAR Observations
Posted to Emissions Forum on 8/12/2012 21 Replies

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I don't know exactly how inspection cycles are defined, but I can probably proceed safely on the assumption that they don't 'cycle' until at least 90 days after the certificate is issued, perhaps significantly longer. If a certificate is never issued, can the cycle extend for more than two years? I don't know.

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This is probably the most common case, and the only negative effect that I foresee is to your SVFR. Strange things could theoretically mess with this, such as the rare but not unheard-of case of a vehicle failing very soon after you passed it.

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Your FuPR takes an immediate hit, whether or not you had even the slightest degree of participation in the reasons for the follow-up fail. These reasons are too numerous to mention here, and only a small portion of them could be logically attributed to you, but STAR doesn't care (other than allegedly factoring in a non-specific positive correction for make, model, year, and apparent mileage). If you are the one to fail it, you are hurting your own FuPR, and helping your SVFR.

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I can see no ill effects related to this scenario, except for the ticking FuPR time bomb that the passing tech armed for the future cycle.

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The only ill effect that I can see is to the FuPR of the tech that was unfortunate enough to pass it after the first fail, if applicable. This pattern is more common in poor neighborhoods, where the REPAIR 'tech' is either incompetent, or the repairs cannot be durably completed due to lack of funds or lack of patience. The passing inspector takes the full FuPR hit, regardless of his/her level of participation in the repair process potentially leading to a certificate. Vehicles that are poorly maintained or are approaching the ends of their useful lives can cause untold FuPR damage. Some successful and competent technicians in this forum have suggested that they utilize a 'bag of tricks' to avoid being placed in that unfortunate position, but I let the objective after-repair test speak for itself, regardless of my level of participation in the 'repair' process.

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Congratulations! There is a high likelihood that you knew what you were doing AND were allowed to do so, although there is a small chance that you are 'covering your own ass', especially if you were the one to certify it the second time.

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This is very similar to Example 4. See my analysis there.

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I know what you mean. There are many more variations on these scenarios, all with their own unique set of effects on the FuPR and SVFR, but I think I've said enough for now. I made some simplifying assumptions for this analysis, and some of those assumptions may not be completely correct. I welcome any critiques to my thought process.

Best wishes!

Michael Barry
Technician
Quick Stop Smog & More
Sacramento, California, USA

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